PHIL190-000: Fresh Sem: Philosophy

Topic: Art and Truth

August 24, 2016 - December 6, 2016
DaysTimeLocationInstructorGERCreditOPUS #
MW
10:00am - 11:15am
Candler Library 121
Lysaker, John
FSEM31425
Appropriate for First Year students.
Study and analysis of the thought of one major philosopher or the study of a special problem or set of related problems in philosophy.

Special Evidence-Focused Seminar. For more information: http://evidence.emory.edu/in-the-news/evidence-focused-courses.html

This seminar will explore the ways in which artworks might embody a kind of knowledge and thus be "true" in some meaningful sense. We will also look at how evidence functions on behalf of knowledge claims, attending to modes of evidence in philosophy, art interpretation, and, to the degree it proves relevant, works of art. Course discussion will move between philosophical texts and art works in the belief that currents in each often contribute to one another's principle pursuits. Attendance is required.

Assignment/ExamDetails% of Total Grade
In order to complete and pass the course, you must write three discussion papers and write a take-home final exam. I will also ask you to write 5 brief, 1-page summary papers. Finally, you must successfully respond to 5 of 10 prompts on Blackboard. The discussion papers (DP) will involve assigned topics that will be available 1 week before the paper is due. They must be typewritten, employ a 12 point font, use standard margins, and run no longer than five pages. The summary papers (SP) should summarize the day�??s reading as a whole. They may run no longer than a single, typewritten page, single-spaced. The final exam will require you to critically engage, in dialogue with two of philosophers we�??ve read, an artwork of your choosing. Your final must be typewritten, use a 12-point font, standard margins, and run no longer than seven pages.

The schedule of courses on O.P.U.S. is the official listing of courses, including days and times they meet and the General Education Requirements they satisfy. Students should use course descriptions as general guidelines. Course requirements, grading details, book lists, and syllabi are subject to change.